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The Writing of Art - Inspired by calligraphy

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by Rozemin Keshvani
First published IBRAAZ 010_06 / 29 November 2016
Presenting six contemporary artists – Graham Day, Hanieh Delecroix, Parastou Forouhar, Farnaz Jahanbin and Katayoun Rouhi – whose work is inspired by traditional arts based on Persian and Arabic script, The Writing of Artexplored the plasticity between word, idea and image, traditionally juxtaposed as discrete systems of the visual and the discursive to pose a challenge to the simple notion that globalisation destroys cultural identity. The exhibition, presented at London's Ismaili Centre as part of the Nour Festival of the Arts, repositioned struggles associated with the loss of language and cultural assimilation to present a kaleidoscope of geographies and practices in which cultural identity is not so muchlostas it is redistributed through de-territorialization and distance.
Two paintings from the Paris-based artist Hanieh Delecroix refract both her former practice as a clinical psychologist working with traum…

GUSTAV METZGER (10 April 1926 - 1 March 2017) - Auto Destructive Art*

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Gustav Metzger died peacefully at his home in Hackney yesterday at the age of 90. He is an artist of overwhelming stature and certainly among the most important of this past century. His practice, teachings, insights and approach are critical for all students of art everywhere. We have only begun to uncover and experience the impact of this artist.  His oeuvre is vast, comprising work, writings, lecture-demonstrations and unrealised projects. His immovable resolve to resist the art market and his deep and unyielding belief that art is and must be politically and socially engaged are commitments from which he never wavered. His life work combined with his gentle yet tenacious personality will no doubt ensure that he becomes one of the most profound influences and models for future generations.


I first met Gustav  in May 2011 at the opening of Roy Ascott's exhibition at SPACE Gallery on Mare Street just a few blocks from the artist's home. It was an overwhelming moment, serendipi…

Pip Benveniste (1921-2010) -- portrait of a forgotten artist

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by Rozemin Keshvani

Pip Benveniste needs to be part of the story of 20th century British art. When we think of Modernist Britain, we think a long list of men such as Lucien Freud, Richard Hamilton, Henry Moore, Ben Nicholson, Victor Pasmore or John Piper. Benveniste was all the more singular within her generation in committing herself to being a full time artist. The price that all artists pay for their singular purpose is, I suspect, visited more painfully upon women artists…She clearly had a context, and as happens with many good artists after their death, a deeper and more rewarding revisiting of their legacy and struggle reveals refreshed pleasures and new insights that allow us to validate again their journey and their place in history. - Professor Andrew Dewdney Pip Benveniste is a tremendously important British artist whose dedication to her art can be seen at every stage of her long and involved career, spanning every media from paint to printing to her most innovative works in…

Brian O’Connell, PALOMAR

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LG London 27th February 2016 - 16th April 2016

by Rozemin Keshvani



Los Angeles-based artist Brian O’Connell has a new show at Laure Genillard Gallery that reflects a philosophically rich and technically sophisticated voice. PALOMAR stages a dialogic with Italo Calvino’s novel Palomar, continuing an investigation into the act of looking that is at once a study of the gaze and the quest for knowledge and an analogy for modern day cosmology as presented through the lens of physics.  
Calvino’s Mr Palomar, like his namesake the Palomar Observatory, is an observer who seeks to unlock the mysteries of the universe through observation, but whose experiences evidence a succession of  failures that tour the problems of epistemology. The novel begins with Mr Palomar observing the waves at the beach, seeking to isolate and read the wave. Palomar, we are told, seeks first ‘simply to see a wave – that is, to perceive all its simultaneous components’.  He vainly waits for an exact repetition of a si…